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September 23 @ 7:00 pm

Things I Have Withheld: An Evening with Kei Miller and Patricia Saunders

Details

Date:
September 23
Time:
7:00 pm

Venue

The Coral Gables Museum
285 Aragon Ave
Coral Gables, FL 33134
+ Google Map

Books & Books and the Coral Gables Museum present…

An Evening with Kei Miller

In Conversation with Patricia Saunders

discussing

Things I Have Withheld 

(Grove Press, $26)

Thursday, September 23, 7 PM ET  IN-PERSON

@ The Coral Gables Museum

REGISTER HERE

Please be aware that at this time, masks are still required inside for all our events by all patrons. Event attendance is capped at 80 for our safety. Thank you for your cooperation.


About the Book:

By acclaimed Forward Prize winner, novelist, and poet, Kei Miller’s linked collection of essays blends memoir and literary commentary to explore the silences that exist in our conversations about race, sex, and gender.

In a deeply moving, critical and lyrical collection of interconnected essays, award-winning writer Kei Miller explores the silences in which so many important things are kept. Miller examines the experience of discrimination through this silence and what it means to breach it — “to risk words, to risk truth; and through the body and the histories those bodies inherit” the crimes that haunt them, and how the meanings of our bodies can shift as we move through the world, variously assuming privilege or victimhood.

Through letters to James Baldwin, encounters with Soca, Carnival, family secrets, love affairs, questions of aesthetics and more, Miller powerfully and imaginatively recounts everyday acts of racism and prejudice from a black, male, queer perspective. An almost disarmingly personal collection, Kei dissects his experiences in Jamaica and Britain, working as an artist and intellectual, making friends and lovers, discovering the possibilities of music and dance, literary criticism, culture, and storytelling.

With both the epigrammatic concision and conversational cadence of his poetry and novels, Things I Have Withheld is a great artistic achievement: a work of innovation and beauty which challenges us to interrogate what seems unsayable and why, “our actions, defense mechanisms, imaginations and interactions” and those of the world around us.

BUY THE BOOK


About the Author:

KEI MILLER is a Jamaican poet, essayist, and novelist, shortlisted for the Costa Poetry Award and winner of the prestigious Forward poetry prize for his collection The Cartographer Tries to Map a Way to Zion. His story collection Fear of Stones was shortlisted for the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for Best First Book, and his most recent novel, Augustown was a finalist for the PEN Open Book Award, and won the Bocas Prize for Caribbean Literature, the Prix Les Afriques, and the Prix Carbet de la Caraïbe et du Tout-Monde. In 2010, the Institute of Jamaica awarded him the Silver Musgrave medal for his contributions to Literature and in 2018 he was awarded the Anthony Sabga medal for Arts & Letters. He has taught at the Universities of Glasgow, Royal Holloway and Exeter and, in 2019, he was the Ida Beam Distinguished Visiting Professor to the University of Iowa.


About the Moderator:

PATRICIA SAUNDERS: Prof. Saunders is an associate professor of English at the University of Miami and Hemispheric Caribbean Studies Faculty Lead at the Miami Insitutite for the Advanced Study of the Americas. Her research and scholarship focus largely on the relationship between sexual identity and national identity in Caribbean literature and popular culture. Her work has appeared in The Bucknell Review, Calabash, Plantation Society in the Americas and Small Axe. She is the author of Alien-Nation and Repatriation: Translating Identity in Anglophone Caribbean Literature. Her book traces the emergence of literary nationalism in the Anglophone Caribbean and maps its transformations through discourses of exile, national and sexual identity, and Diaspora race politics in three cultural and political contexts: pre-independence Trinidad, post-independence Britain and the Civil rights era in the United States.